Presidents Day

Presidents Day

Did you know that President’s day was originally called Washington’s Birthday? It was initially meant to honor solely the first American President, George Washington. Nowadays, President’s Day is celebrated every third Monday of February to honor our American President’s over the years. Many car dealerships use this day to present discounts and deals on cars, as many people have the day off from work. You can spend your day looking for a new car, or take the time off to enjoy family and friends while basking under the sun at a beach, park, resort, or other relaxing venue.

Generally viewed as a patriotic celebration, much like Independence Day, the colors red, white and blue always come into play for the decorations. Star shaped balloons and American flag plates, cups, napkins and table covers are bound to show up in your event. I would recommend organizing a picnic at the park with all your favorite picnic foods such as peanut butter and jelly sandwiches, chips, potato salad, juice, hot links or hot dogs, and burgers. Set up the patriotic themed inflatable bounce house, obstacle course or water slide for all the kids and adults to participate in. Hire some entertainment such as clowns, face painters, balloon twisters, or magicians to bring a little excitement to your activity.

There are several areas around the nation that honors the President’s by having parades or reenactments of their time. To teach the children about our past and present leaders, you could hold a puppet show or a play to help in keeping their attention. This way the children can have an understanding of why America observes this day.

Rosh Hashanah

Rosh Hashanah

One of the most important Jewish Holidays, Rosh Hashanah recollects the creation of the world. Whether you are visiting the synagogue or listening to the Shofar from home, Rosh Hashanah is a time to reflect on God’s power and his judgement for the coming year. It is meant to be a fresh start, so reaching out to people you have any relation to, to clean the slate, is a good way to spend the weeks leading up to the holiday. Whether words or actions, making things right and making amends with people you may insulted or put down is a good start. Send those people flowers or cards.

Now for the party, which is typically held on the final day of Rosh Hashanah; you’re going to need music, decorations, and maybe a cake. Hire a band to play some Jewish classics, as you reflect and remember. Decorate with blue and silver streamers, balloon bouquets, napkins, table covers, plates, cups, and homemade dreidels, candles and banners. Prepare bowls of various fruits to use as centerpieces. Do arts and crafts with the kids, creating Stars of David using airbrushes and stencils. Cook a traditional meal; or you could hire someone to do the cooking for you or cater and prepare a large feast for the evening.

With the tradition of blowing the shofar on Rosh Hashanah, some children might not be as acquainted with Jewish practice and custom, therefore, a fun substitute for them could be to blow noise makers. Teaching kids about the holiday can be fun and creative; arrange a puppet show to express the main points of Rosh Hashanah, or hire a storyteller to bring some life into the story of the holiday.